Can You Bring Drumsticks on Planes?

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Close-up of wooden drumsticks

Carry-on bags


Yes

Checked luggage


Yes

Rules for Flights in the USA

In the United States, drumsticks are allowed in carry-on and checked baggage on airplanes. However, TSA states that they require a physical inspection when going through security. Variations of drumsticks like brushes, rods, and mallets aren’t specifically mentioned, but TSA declares the complete set of drumsticks is allowed in cabin and cargo baggage, without mentioning any exceptions. If anything, bigger mallets and brushes might catch a security agent’s attention, but in general, they go through airport security without any inconveniences.

Note: TSA’s website has an entry forbidding mallets on planes, but it refers to mallets used for construction. Drum mallets similar in size or material to this hand tool might get confiscated at security.

Rules for Flights in Other Countries

On flights within Canada, Europe, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, China, and India drumsticks aren’t specifically mentioned. But, for the most part, the rules are similar to the United States, and drumsticks and all their variations are allowed in cabin and cargo baggage. However, the security agent always has the final decision on if they are allowed through security or not.

 

Sources: For writing this article, we took information only from official sources, like airline regulators, government websites, and major airlines. If you want to confirm that our information is accurate and up to date, click on any of the links mentioned above. We linked out to where we found this information for each country.

Disclaimer: The final decision of whether you can bring drumsticks on planes always rests on the security officer. Some airlines also have additional rules that may be different.

Frequently Asked Questions About Bringing Drumsticks and Other Drumming Instruments on Planes

Does it matter what material my drumsticks are made from (wood, metal, aluminum, carbon fiber, etc.)?

In theory, it doesn’t matter what material your drumsticks are made of – they are allowed in hand and checked baggage when traveling in the United States without any restrictions. TSA doesn’t point out any exceptions on its website and simply lists all drumsticks as allowed on flights. However, heavier or larger drumsticks made out of metal or aluminum might be more concerning for airport security. The TSA agent always makes the final call, but typically drumsticks are allowed through security whether they are made of wood, metal, aluminum, or carbon fiber.

Are drum brushes allowed on planes?

Generally, drum brushes are allowed in carry-on and checked baggage on planes in the United States. TSA doesn’t mention drum brushes specifically as banned or allowed, but it does state the complete drumsticks set is permitted in hand and cargo baggage. However, if the security agent at the airport believes metal drum brushes are a danger to other passengers, then they might ask you to check them in.

Can I also bring drum mallets on a flight?

Overall, drum mallets are allowed in carry-on and checked baggage on planes in the United States. Although mallets aren’t listed specifically, TSA’s website states the complete drumsticks set is permitted aboard aircraft. However, larger mallets like the ones used for bass percussion might be considered a weapon and prevented from going through security. Passengers should know that TSA specifies that mallets are forbidden on carry-on, but they refer to mallets used as hand tools (construction). Drum mallets that are similar in size or material to a construction mallet might not be allowed through security.

Can I take drum hot rods on a plane?

For the most part, you can bring drum hot rods on carry-on and checked baggage on flights in the United States. Hot rods aren’t mentioned particularly by the TSA on their website, but all drumsticks are usually allowed through security without any problem. Yet, there might be some exceptions, as the security agent at the airport makes the final call on whether it’s safe to take them in the cabin or not.

Read Next: Can You Bring Cymbals and Other Drumming Instruments on Planes?

Can I take drumsticks through security?

Generally, travelers can take drumsticks through airport security in the United States. According to the TSA, drumsticks are allowed in carry-on and checked baggage on flights in the United States. You don’t necessarily have to take them out of your carry-on bag, but security officials might want to do a manual inspection. In that case, it’s best to have your drumsticks accessible in a drumsticks bag you can open easily. Although all drumsticks are usually allowed in the cabin, the security agent at the airport has the final word on it.

Is it better to pack drumsticks in hand or checked luggage?

In general, it’s better to pack drumsticks in carry-on luggage when traveling. Despite their sturdy appearance, most drumsticks could snap if they are under a lot of weight. Cargo baggage is usually topped with dozens of bags, plus it’s subjected to harsh handling. Packing your drumsticks in your carry-on is the best way to keep them safe and prevent them from getting lost. However, if the security agent believes your drumsticks might be used as a weapon, then they might get confiscated. But this is a rare scenario, and drumsticks generally go through airport security without major problems.

How can I keep my drumsticks protected when traveling?

The best way to keep your drumsticks protected when you’re traveling is by packing them in your carry-on luggage. Although you could pack them individually, it’s best to pack your drumstick set in a drumsticks bag holder. You can even carry that bag as a personal item, outside of your carry-on. A drumstick bag will make the inspection process easy for you and the security agent, as you can easily retrieve and store the drumsticks again.
Read next: Can you bring a bicycle pump on a plane?

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